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Archive for the ‘Behavioral Finance’ Category

Investing Advice from the Onion

August 1, 2013 Leave a comment

It’s quite a world we live in. The (satirical newspaper) The Onion earlier this week proffered investing advice as good as anything I’ve seen on any financial news source this year: Report: Only .00003% Of Things That Happen Actually Matter.

This is so true for investing it’s almost (ahem) a joke. People fret over so much nonsense and minutiae each day in the market. For long-term investors trying to build wealth over time, the simple reality is at least 99.99% of what gets reported out there is mere noise or beside the point. And in the focusing on noise, it’s easy for folks to simply overlook what matters: stocks up nicely this year as earnings increase, in the context of what’s been a strong and long bull market, seeing new all-time highs in many spots.

Always and everywhere with financial and economic news, ask yourself if what you’re reading really matters.

Please, No More “Downside Risks” for Central Planners

June 25, 2013 Leave a comment

If you’re like me, you get annoyed ubiquitously by the clichéd, overused, nonsense, nondescript lingo central bankers, central planners, politicians, and guru economists routinely employ. My current most peevish is “downside risk.” As in, “Currently downside risks for the economy are stronger than a month ago.” Or, “We see downside risk abating in the intermediate term.”

What does this mean? It means nothing. It’s gibberish. In the era where central bankers claim to be more open kimono, what they really are doing is just saying more words. The opacity is the same, as depicted by the current—and bizarre—speculation over “tapering” clogging today’s financial headlines.

When you see this stuff, don’t try to read tea leaves. Just ignore it until there is something concrete to form an opinion.

Demographics Is the Next Investing Fad

May 17, 2013 Leave a comment

Looking at history and the long waves of demographics is a great and fine thing. It can tell you a heck of a lot. It’s frequently the case that history is driven by large, abstract, impersonal forces rather than singular decisive events. But…

…to start forecasting equity markets using these metrics is a perilous thing. And it’s becoming all the rage lately.

The problem with demographics as equity market forecasters is that, first, in order for you to be right, you might have to wait, you know, a generation or more. Also, even if you can shoehorn a theory to explain all, at best you only have a few good data points to support the correlation tied to equity markets. That’s not much to stake a +20 year forecast on.

Thinking Back, Looking Forward

April 17, 2013 Leave a comment

It’s an old adage: Investors have short memories. Another: the market discounts the future.

Here’s some interesting psychological research as to one reason that may be: Yesterday came suddenly

“Because future events are associated with diminishing distance, while those in the past are thought of as receding, something happening in one month feels psychologically closer than something that happened a month ago.”

Unreliable Science? Same with Investing.

April 15, 2013 Leave a comment

The next time an investing guru presents you with ironclad statistical results, remember this article:

Unreliable neuroscience? Why power matters – Suzi Gage

In a paper published today in Nature Reviews Neuroscience we reviewed the power of studies in the neuroscience literature, and found that, on average, it is very low – around 20%. Low power undermines the reliability of neuroscience research in several important ways.

The Inherent Stupidity and Non-Science of Hedonomics

March 7, 2013 Leave a comment

As with so much of her work, Deirdre McCloskey has penned a biting and powerful critique of today’s economic study of “happiness”.

Happyism by DEIRDRE N. MCCLOSKEY

This stuff is worth being aware of because it’s popping up in political discourse regularly. In particular, note the creeping paternalism lately becoming a full infestation in behavioral economics.

What Most Miss about the Flash Crash

February 13, 2013 Leave a comment

Markets adapt, and long-term profits approach zero for high-speed trading. The winners are market participants, who benefit from higher liquidity and smaller bid/ask spreads. The part most folks miss about the flash crash is the market self-corrected as fast as it sank.

Regulator, Go Slow on Reining in High-Speed Trading: Algorithm-driven trading appears to be self-correcting. That’s good—the hyper-fast world needs it.

By HOLLY A. BELL

 

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